“King Gwuang-chwun of the Han” (Translated from the Chinese by P. E. Rempel)

King Gwuang-chwun of the Han was fond of digging up ancient graves. When he broke into a tomb at Luanshu, the coffin, still inhabited, and all of the pledges and utensils had been smashed to pieces and ruined. Then a white-furred fox appeared which, upon seeing the grave-diggers, immediately dashed off. Everybody present gave chase but failed to nab it, managing only to spear its back paw with a halberd.

That night, the king dreamed of a man whose eyebrows and beard had grown completely white. This man stepped up to the king and asked, “Why did you hurt my left foot?” He then whacked King Gwuang-chwun’s left foot with his staff. The king saw his foot swell and it grew terribly painful: an ulcer took form. His condition remained the same for a time until it finally killed him.

Text: Taiping Guangji, volume 447

For another story of the occult click here.

***

Find me at Facebook here.

Advertisements

One thought on ““King Gwuang-chwun of the Han” (Translated from the Chinese by P. E. Rempel)

  1. Pingback: Of Ghosts and Meatballs: A Ghost Story from Medieval China (trans. by P. E. Rempel) | P. E. Rempel

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s